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Ethics

Research: RTDNA salary survey

ImageNewsroom salary highlights: TV salaries gain ground, not radio; winners and losers and starting pay; who is under contract... The latest RTDNA/Hofstra University Annual Survey found that local television news salaries rose by 1.9% in 2014. That's up by 0.3 from a year ago, and with inflation an extremely low 1.6%, that means that TV news salaries gained slightly in purchasing power last year. The spread of 0.3 this year at least beats the 0.1 difference a year ago.

Columbia issues scathing report on 'Rolling Stone' rape story

ImageThe Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism released a scathing report of the 'Rolling Stone' magazine's journalistic practices regarding an alleged gang rape at a University of Virginia frat house. The Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism issued a scathing report Sunday on the editorial breakdown at Rolling Stone magazine that allowed publication of a searing, now thoroughly discredited story about a woman who said she had been gang raped at the University of Virginia, ending a three-month review meant to shed a light on and calm the storm surrounding a saga that had triggered a police probe and institutional soul searching at the university.

5 facts about the state of local TV newsrooms

ImageThe market for local television stations was bullish in 2013, driven by the growing political ad revenue and fees paid to those outlets by cable, satellite and telecommunications companies for the right to carry their programming. In 2013, about 300 full-power local stations changed hands for a combined price tag of more than $8 billion, as major companies — from the Sinclair Broadcast Group to the Tribune Company — dramatically expanded their local TV portfolios. Despite that boom, a new survey of 1,300 local television news directors produced by RTDNA and Hofstra University paints a mixed picture of the staffing and spending patterns in local television news.

The future of journalism through the eyes of interns

Juniper Rose likes the convenience of audio news. Katrina Cameron reads news mostly on her iPhone. For Vanessa Ochavillo, Twitter is the best way to stay on top of many different news sources. Daniel Rothberg prefers emailed newsletters in the morning. Will Wright reads a variety of sites but follows Al Jazeera and Reuters for international news. Of all The Bee's interns this summer - we have 15 in news - only the youngest, Isabelle Taft of Yale University, still prefers the printed newspaper to stay informed. That's a preference I more often hear from readers at least in their 50s or 60s. Yet the habits of our interns reflect modern-day news consumption - they are choosing to read what they want, when they want it and how they want it.

Your Local TV News Station Would Like to Buy a Drone

ImageEvery reporter knows the feeling of wanting to get closer to the action. There are a lot of traditional ways to achieve this – inside sources, telephoto lenses, news helicopters, just to name a few. But now that ever-cheaper drones can be outfitted with cameras, journalists have a whole new way to get a better angle on a story. And they want to use it.  The problem is that in the United States, despite the increasing use of drones for things like photographing real estate, there are no real rules to control their commercial operation. The FAA is in charge of regulating “unmanned aircraft systems,” but they have been slow to formulate guidelines, and have admitted they won’t meet the 2015 deadline for doing so. In the meantime, it's technically illegal to operate a UAS for commercial use, and can result in a $10,000 fine, though that law is only enforced on occasion.