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Newsmakers

The plague of fake news is getting worse -- here's how to protect yourself

It's time for a new rule on the web: Double, no, triple check before you share. Especially if it seems too good to be true. Why? Look no further than Donald Trump's Twitter account. Trump claimed Sunday morning that "Twitter, Google and Facebook are burying the FBI criminal investigation of Clinton." Not only was there no proof of this, but it was pretty easy to disprove. The FBI email inquiry was at the top of Google News; FBI director James Comey's name was at the top of Facebook's "trending" box; and Twitter's "moments" section had a prominent story about the controversy. Nevertheless, Trump's wrong-headed "burying" claim was his most popular tweet of the day. About 25,000 accounts retweeted it and almost 50,000 "liked" it, helping the falsehood spread far and wide.

Video Journalist Uses Mobile Phone to Go Live in 90 Seconds

ImageWith some stories happening so quickly they need to be covered before a team gets there, or happening at a time when few resources are available, turning to mobile journalism is becoming the increasingly common response. Harriet Hadfield, a reporter at Sky News, spoke to news:rewired about using a mobile phone for live broadcasts. Sky prides itself in being able to "go live" in only 90 seconds, so equipped with her toolkit on stage, she talked us through her essentials.

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