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Getting Immersive With VR: Jaunt makes a push for 360-degree video

ImageImagine being ABC News reporter Alexander Marquardt, reporting from a war zone in the Syrian capital of Damascus, apprising viewers of what he sees around him. Basically, that's what TV reporters do. But is it, really? That question has arisen more in the past year or so, because not only can a reporter working with a virtual reality (VR) camera still report about their surroundings, they can capture the 360-degree survey of the scene and bring the viewer along while doing so. That's where companies like Palo Alto, Calif.-based Jaunt enter the picture.

Small Stations Go Big During Breaking News

ImageWhen a gunman opened fire Oct. 1 in a classroom at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Ore., KVAL had only two reporters in the rural town. ABC affiliate KEZI had just one. The vast majority of staff and resources for the two Eugene stations, as well as others in the closest TV market (DMA No. 120), were 72 miles north. They sent staff to the hospital and blood bank in addition to the school, while reporters on their own had TVU backpacks and sent content back. The stations dealt with rumors and national media requests, not to mention the aftermath of a tragedy in their backyard, but they nonetheless produced wall-to-wall coverage. "One thing we do not have is a small-market attitude here," said JR Jackson, KVAL Eugene general manager. "We don't think of ourselves as a small-market team."

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